PACMPL (OOPSLA) seeks contributions on all aspects of programming languages and software engineering. Authors of papers published in PACMPL will present their work at OOPSLA in Boston.

Papers may target any stage of software development, including requirements, modeling, prototyping, design, implementation, generation, analysis, verification, testing, evaluation, maintenance, and reuse of software systems. Contributions may include the development of new tools (such as language front-ends, program analyses, and runtime systems), new techniques (such as methodologies, design processes, and code organization approaches), new principles (such as formalisms, proofs, models, and paradigms), and new evaluations (such as experiments, corpora analyses, user studies, and surveys).

Proceedings are available online.

Livestream

SPLASH Keynotes and OOPSLA talks will be livestreamed at the following links:

Q&A

Both remote and in-person participants can ask questions using sli.do for live streamed SPLASH Keynotes and OOPSLA talks.

Papers

Title
Link to publication DOI
DOI Media Attached
Link to publication DOI Pre-print
Link to publication Pre-print File Attached
Pre-print
Pre-print
Link to publication DOI File Attached
Link to publication DOI Pre-print
DOI Pre-print File Attached
DOI Authorizer link Pre-print

Call for Papers

Papers appear in an issue of the Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages (PACMPL). PACMPL is a Gold Open Access journal, all papers will be freely available to the public. Authors can voluntarily cover the article processing charge (400$), but payment is not required.

Paper Selection Criteria

We consider the following criteria when evaluating papers:

Novelty: The paper presents new ideas and results and places them appropriately within the context established by previous research.

Importance: The paper contributes to the advancement of knowledge in the field. We also welcomes papers that diverge from the dominant trajectory of the field.

Evidence: The paper presents sufficient evidence supporting its claims, such as proofs, implemented systems, experimental results, statistical analyses, case studies, and anecdotes.

Clarity: The paper presents its contributions, methodology and results clearly.

Review Process

A two-stage process with lightweight double-blind reviewing is used to select papers. This FAQ address common concerns.

The first reviewing stage assess papers using the above criteria. At the end of that stage a set of papers is conditionally accepted.

Authors of conditionally accepted papers must make a set of mandatory revisions. The second reviewing phase assesses whether the revisions have been addressed. The expectation is that the revisions can be addressed and that conditionally accepted papers will be accepted in the second phase.

The second submission must be accompanied by a cover letter mapping each mandatory revision request to specific parts of the paper.

Submission Requirements

For double-blind reviewing papers must adhere to two rules:

  1. author names and institutions must be omitted, and
  2. references to authors’ own related work should be in the third person (e.g., not “We build on our previous work …” but rather “We build on the work of …”).

The purpose of this process is to help reviewers come to an initial judgement about the paper without bias, not to make it impossible for them to discover the authors if they were to try. Nothing should be done in the name of anonymity that weakens the submission or makes the job of reviewing the paper more difficult.

Submissions must conform to both the ACM Policies for Authorship and SIGPLAN’s Republication Policy. Authors will be required to sign a license or copyright release.

The official publication date is the date the proceedings are made available in the ACM Digital Library, which may be up to two weeks prior to the first day of the conference.

Artifact Evaluation

Authors of conditionally accepted papers are encouraged to submit supporting materials for Artifact Evaluation.
Authors should indicate with their initial submission if an artifact exists and describe its nature and limitations.

Further information is  here.

Questions

For additional information or answers to questions please write to oopsla@splashcon.org.

Wed 7 Nov

splash-2018-OOPSLA
10:30 - 12:00: OOPSLA - Parallelism and Performance at Studio 2
Chair(s): Arjun GuhaUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst
splash-2018-OOPSLA10:30 - 10:52
Talk
Nachshon CohenEPFL, Switzerland
splash-2018-OOPSLA10:52 - 11:15
Talk
Benoit DalozeJKU Linz, Austria, Arie TalTechnion, Stefan MarrUniversity of Kent, Hanspeter MössenböckJKU Linz, Austria, Erez PetrankTechnion
Pre-print
splash-2018-OOPSLA11:15 - 11:37
Talk
Remigius MeierETH Zurich, Switzerland, Armin RigoPyPy.org, Switzerland, Thomas GrossETH Zurich
splash-2018-OOPSLA11:37 - 12:00
Talk
splash-2018-OOPSLA
10:30 - 12:00: OOPSLA - Types and Effects at Studio 1
Chair(s): Colin GordonDrexel University
splash-2018-OOPSLA10:30 - 10:52
Talk
Jonathan Immanuel BrachthäuserUniversity of Tübingen, Germany, Philipp SchusterUniversity of Tübingen, Germany, Klaus OstermannUniversity of Tübingen, Germany
splash-2018-OOPSLA10:52 - 11:15
Talk
Fabian MuehlboeckCornell University, Ross TateCornell University
Link to publication DOI Pre-print
splash-2018-OOPSLA11:15 - 11:37
Talk
Francesco Zappa NardelliInria, Julia BelyakovaNortheastern University, USA, Artem PelenitsynNortheastern University, Benjamin ChungNortheastern University, Jeff BezansonJulia Computing, Jan VitekNortheastern University
splash-2018-OOPSLA11:37 - 12:00
Talk
Hendrik van AntwerpenTU Delft, Casper Bach PoulsenDelft University of Technology, Arjen RouvoetDelft University of Technology, Eelco VisserDelft University of Technology
Link to publication DOI File Attached
splash-2018-OOPSLA
13:30 - 15:00: OOPSLA - Language Design 1 at Studio 2
Chair(s): Eelco VisserDelft University of Technology
splash-2018-OOPSLA13:30 - 13:52
Talk
Roland LeißaSaarland University, Germany, Klaas BoescheSaarland University, Sebastian HackSaarland University, Germany, Arsène Pérard-GayotSaarland University, Germany, Richard MembarthDFKI, Germany, Philipp SlusallekDFKI, Germany, André MüllerJohannes Gutenberg University, Bertil SchmidtJohannes Gutenberg University
splash-2018-OOPSLA13:52 - 14:15
Talk
Jeff BezansonJulia Computing, Benjamin ChungNortheastern University, Jiahao ChenCapital One, Stefan Karpinski, Viral B ShahJulia Computing, Jan VitekNortheastern University, Lionel ZoubritzkyÉcole Normale Supérieure
splash-2018-OOPSLA14:15 - 14:37
Talk
splash-2018-OOPSLA14:37 - 15:00
Talk
splash-2018-OOPSLA
13:30 - 15:00: OOPSLA - Security at Studio 1
Chair(s): Tobias WrigstadUppsala University
splash-2018-OOPSLA13:30 - 13:52
Talk
Peixuan LiPenn State University, Danfeng ZhangPennsylvania State University
splash-2018-OOPSLA13:52 - 14:15
Talk
Neville GrechUniversity of Athens, Michael KongUniversity of Sydney, Anton JurisevicUniversity of Sydney, Lexi BrentUniversity of Sydney, Bernhard ScholzThe University of Sydney, Yannis SmaragdakisUniversity of Athens
Link to publication Pre-print File Attached
splash-2018-OOPSLA14:15 - 14:37
Talk
Chu-Pan WongCarnegie Mellon University, Jens MeinickeMagdeburg University, Lukas Lazarek, Christian KästnerCarnegie Mellon University
splash-2018-OOPSLA14:37 - 15:00
Talk
Kalev AlpernasTel Aviv University, Cormac FlanaganUniversity of California, Santa Cruz, Sadjad FouladiStanford University, Leonid RyzhykVMware Research, Mooly SagivTel Aviv University, Thomas Schmitz, Keith WinsteinStanford University
splash-2018-OOPSLA
15:30 - 17:00: OOPSLA - Compiler Optimization at Studio 2
Chair(s): Patrick LamUniversity of Waterloo
splash-2018-OOPSLA15:30 - 15:52
Talk
splash-2018-OOPSLA15:52 - 16:15
Talk
Xiaoran XuRice University, Keith CooperRice University, Jacob BrockUniversity of Rochester, Yan Zhang, Handong YeFuturewei Technologies
splash-2018-OOPSLA16:15 - 16:37
Talk
Juneyoung LeeSeoul National University, Chung-Kil HurSeoul National University, Ralf JungMPI-SWS, Zhengyang LiuUniversity of Utah, John RegehrUniversity of Utah, Nuno P. LopesMicrosoft Research
splash-2018-OOPSLA16:37 - 17:00
Talk
Zhangxiaowen GongUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Zhi ChenUniversity of California, Irvine, Justin SzadayUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, David WongIntel, Zehra SuraIBM Research, Neftali Watkinson, Saeed MalekiMicrosoft Research, David PaduaUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Alexander VeidenbaumUniversity of California, Irvine, Alexandru NicolauUniversity of California, Irvine, Josep TorrellasUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
splash-2018-OOPSLA
15:30 - 17:00: OOPSLA - Language Design 2 at Studio 1
Chair(s): Jonathan AldrichCarnegie Mellon University
splash-2018-OOPSLA15:30 - 15:52
Talk
Mikaël MayerEPFL, Switzerland, Viktor KuncakEPFL, Switzerland, Ravi ChughUniversity of Chicago
splash-2018-OOPSLA15:52 - 16:15
Talk
Jason OttUniversity of California, Riverside, Tyson LovelessUniversity of California, Riverside, Chris CurtisUniversity of California, Riverside, Mohsen LesaniUniversity of California, Riverside, Philip BriskUniversity of California, Riverside
splash-2018-OOPSLA16:15 - 16:37
Talk
Pascal WeisenburgerTechnische Universität Darmstadt, Mirko Köhler, Guido SalvaneschiTU Darmstadt
splash-2018-OOPSLA16:37 - 17:00
Talk
Michael FaesETH Zurich, Thomas GrossETH Zurich
Link to publication DOI
splash-2018-OOPSLA
17:05 - 18:00: OOPSLA - Awards / SIGPLAN Town Hall Meeting at Studio 1
Chair(s): Manu SridharanUber, Jens PalsbergUniversity of California, Los Angeles

Thu 8 Nov

splash-2018-OOPSLA
10:30 - 12:00: OOPSLA - Types and Contracts at Studio 2
Chair(s): Hakjoo OhKorea University
splash-2018-OOPSLA10:30 - 10:52
Talk
Deepak D'Souza, Ezudheen P, Pranav GargUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Daniel NeiderMax Planck Institute for Software Systems, P. MadhusudanUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
splash-2018-OOPSLA10:52 - 11:15
Talk
Niki VazouIMDEA Software Institute, Éric TanterUniversity of Chile & Inria Paris, David Van HornUniversity of Maryland, USA
splash-2018-OOPSLA11:15 - 11:37
Talk
Daniel FelteyNorthwestern University, USA, Ben GreenmanNortheastern University, USA, Christophe ScholliersUniversiteit Gent, Belgium, Robby FindlerNorthwestern University, USA, Vincent St-AmourNorthwestern University
splash-2018-OOPSLA11:37 - 12:00
Talk
Jack WilliamsUniversity of Edinburgh, UK, J. Garrett MorrisUniversity of Kansas, USA, Philip WadlerUniversity of Edinburgh, UK
splash-2018-OOPSLA
10:30 - 12:00: OOPSLA - Weak Memory and Refactoring at Studio 1
Chair(s): Richard JonesUniversity of Kent
splash-2018-OOPSLA10:30 - 10:52
Talk
Parosh Aziz AbdullaUppsala University, Sweden, Mohamed Faouzi AtigUppsala University, Bengt JonssonUppsala University, Tuan Phong NgoUppsala University
splash-2018-OOPSLA10:52 - 11:15
Talk
Peizhao OuUniversity of California, Irvine, Brian DemskyUniversity of California, Irvine
splash-2018-OOPSLA11:15 - 11:37
Talk
Azalea RaadMPI-SWS, Germany, Viktor VafeiadisMPI-SWS, Germany
splash-2018-OOPSLA11:37 - 12:00
Talk
splash-2018-OOPSLA
13:30 - 15:00: OOPSLA - Parallelism and Correctness at Studio 1
Chair(s): Werner DietlUniversity of Waterloo, Canada
splash-2018-OOPSLA13:30 - 13:52
Talk
Joscha DrechslerTechnische Universität Darmstadt, Ragnar MogkTechnische Universität Darmstadt, Guido SalvaneschiTU Darmstadt, Mira MeziniTU Darmstadt
DOI Pre-print File Attached
splash-2018-OOPSLA13:52 - 14:15
Talk
Sam BlackshearFacebook, Nikos Gorogiannis, Peter W. O'HearnFacebook and University College London, Ilya SergeyYale-NUS College
Pre-print
splash-2018-OOPSLA14:15 - 14:37
Talk
Umang MathurUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dileep KiniUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Mahesh ViswanathanUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
DOI Authorizer link Pre-print
splash-2018-OOPSLA14:37 - 15:00
Talk
Christian Gram KalhaugeUniversity of California, Los Angeles, Jens PalsbergUniversity of California, Los Angeles
splash-2018-OOPSLA
13:30 - 15:00: OOPSLA - Static Analysis at Studio 2
Chair(s): Karim AliUniversity of Alberta
splash-2018-OOPSLA13:30 - 13:52
Talk
Tamás Szabóitemis / TU Delft, Gábor BergmannBudapest University of Technology and Economics / MTA-BME Lendület Research Group on Cyber-Physical Systems, Hungary, Sebastian ErdwegTU Delft, Markus Völterindependent / itemis, Germany
splash-2018-OOPSLA13:52 - 14:15
Talk
Minseok JeonKorea University, South Korea, Sehun JeongKorea University, Hakjoo OhKorea University
splash-2018-OOPSLA14:15 - 14:37
Talk
Yue LiAarhus University, Denmark, Tian TanAarhus University, Denmark, Anders MøllerAarhus University, Yannis SmaragdakisUniversity of Athens
splash-2018-OOPSLA14:37 - 15:00
Talk
Girish Maskeri RamaInfosys Limited, Raghavan KomondoorIndian Institute of Science, Bangalore, Himanshu SharmaIndian Institute of Science, Bangalore
splash-2018-OOPSLA
15:30 - 17:00: OOPSLA - Performance at Studio 1
Chair(s): Adam WelcUber Technologies
splash-2018-OOPSLA15:30 - 15:52
Talk
DOI Media Attached
splash-2018-OOPSLA15:52 - 16:15
Talk
Sebastian BurckhardtMicrosoft Research, Tim CoppietersVrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium
splash-2018-OOPSLA16:15 - 16:37
Talk
Nachshon CohenEPFL, Switzerland, David T. AksunEPFL, James LarusEPFL
splash-2018-OOPSLA16:37 - 17:00
Talk
Will DietzUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Vikram AdveUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Link to publication DOI Pre-print
splash-2018-OOPSLA
15:30 - 17:00: OOPSLA - Potpourri at Studio 2
Chair(s): Anders MøllerAarhus University
splash-2018-OOPSLA15:30 - 15:52
Talk
Michael PradelTU Darmstadt, Koushik SenUniversity of California, Berkeley
splash-2018-OOPSLA15:52 - 16:15
Talk
Daniel W. Barowy, Emery BergerUniversity of Massachusetts, Amherst, Benjamin ZornMicrosoft Research
splash-2018-OOPSLA16:15 - 16:37
Talk
James BornholtUniversity of Washington, Emina TorlakUniversity of Washington
splash-2018-OOPSLA16:37 - 17:00
Talk
Saswat PadhiUniversity of California, Los Angeles, Prateek JainMicrosoft Research Lab, India, Daniel PerelmanUniversity of Washington, USA, Alex PolozovMicrosoft Research, Sumit GulwaniMicrosoft Research, Todd MillsteinUniversity of California, Los Angeles

Fri 9 Nov

splash-2018-OOPSLA
10:30 - 12:00: OOPSLA - Program Synthesis at Studio 2
Chair(s): Jens PalsbergUniversity of California, Los Angeles
splash-2018-OOPSLA10:30 - 10:52
Talk
Yuepeng WangUniversity of Texas at Austin, Xinyu WangUT Austin, Isil DilligUT Austin
splash-2018-OOPSLA10:52 - 11:15
Talk
Pavol BielikETH Zürich, Marc FischerETH Zurich, Martin VechevETH Zürich
splash-2018-OOPSLA11:15 - 11:37
Talk
Chenglong WangUniversity of Washington, USA, Alvin CheungUniversity of Washington, Rastislav BodikUniversity of Washington
splash-2018-OOPSLA11:37 - 12:00
Talk
Junho LeeKorea University, Dowon SongKorea University, Sunbeom SoKorea University, Hakjoo OhKorea University
splash-2018-OOPSLA
10:30 - 12:00: OOPSLA - Testing at Studio 1
Chair(s): Kim BrucePomona College
splash-2018-OOPSLA10:30 - 10:52
Talk
Ankush DesaiUniversity of California, Berkeley, Amar PhanishayeeMicrosoft Research, Shaz QadeerMicrosoft Research, Sanjit SeshiaUC Berkeley
splash-2018-OOPSLA10:52 - 11:15
Talk
Burcu Kulahcioglu OzkanMPI-SWS, Germany, Rupak MajumdarMPI-SWS, Germany, Filip NiksicMPI-SWS, Mitra Tabaei BefroueiVienna University of Technology, Georg WeissenbacherTechnische Universität Wien
splash-2018-OOPSLA11:15 - 11:37
Talk
Marija SelakovicTU Darmstadt, Germany, Michael PradelTU Darmstadt, Rezwana Karim NawrinSamsung Research America, Frank TipNortheastern University
splash-2018-OOPSLA11:37 - 12:00
Talk
Saba AlimadadiNortheastern University, Di ZhongNortheastern University, USA, Magnus MadsenAarhus University, Frank TipNortheastern University
splash-2018-OOPSLA
13:30 - 14:15: OOPSLA - Safe Merging at Studio 2
Chair(s): David PearceVictoria University of Wellington
splash-2018-OOPSLA13:30 - 13:52
Talk
Marcelo SousaUniversity of Oxford, Isil DilligUT Austin, Shuvendu K. LahiriMicrosoft Research
splash-2018-OOPSLA13:52 - 14:15
Talk
Fengmin Zhu, Fei HeTsinghua University
splash-2018-OOPSLA
13:30 - 14:15: OOPSLA - Verification at Studio 1
Chair(s): Tony HoskingAustralian National University / Data61
splash-2018-OOPSLA13:30 - 13:52
Talk
Brett BostonMassachusetts Institute of Technology, Zoe GongMassachusetts Institute of Technology, Michael CarbinMassachusetts Institute of Technology
splash-2018-OOPSLA13:52 - 14:15
Talk
Gowtham KakiPurdue University, Kapil EarankyPurdue University, KC SivaramakrishnanUniversity of Cambridge, Suresh JagannathanPurdue University

It is my great pleasure to present the program of the 2018 ACM SIGPLAN Conference on Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages, and Applications. OOPSLA has broadened significantly beyond its original focus on object-oriented programming, and this year’s program contains papers on a diverse set of topics, addressing challenges across the software development lifecycle in both traditional and emerging domains.

This is the second year that OOPSLA papers are being published as an issue of the Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages (PACMPL). As OOPSLA review committee chair, I was responsible for forming and leading the review committee, which provides feedback on paper submissions and decides which papers would appear in this year’s PACMPL OOPSLA issue.

In forming the review committee, my aim was to ensure sufficient expertise across OOPSLA’s wide topic range while also achieving diversity across seniority, demographics, geography, and institution type (industry vs. academia). I formed candidate lists leveraging Frank Tip’s PC-miner tool and helpful feedback from the OOPSLA steering committee. The review committee did an outstanding job of providing detailed, constructive feedback on submissions and selecting an excellent set of papers for publication; I was truly amazed by their hard work and dedication.

During the review process, most papers received three reviews, with additional reviews assigned when expertise or confidence was lacking. After extensive online discussion, papers with a champion reviewer were chosen to be discussed at an in-person review committee meeting, which was co-located with PLDI 2018. During the meeting, we tried to lean positive in discussions: if a paper had an enthusiastic champion, and there were no serious concerns raised by other reviewers, we typically accepted the paper. OOPSLA’s two-phase review process aided this approach, as we could accept papers with minor flaws that could be addressed by the second-phase deadline (roughly 6 weeks after phase one notification). On papers where I was conflicted, David Grove administered the decision process and led the discussion. In the end, we accepted 60 of 216 submissions, an acceptance rate of 27.8%.

An external review committee was primarily tasked with reviewing all submissions co-authored by a member of the main review committee or the general chair. As required by SIGPLAN, review committee submissions were held to a higher standard to avoid any appearance of favoritism. Of 25 such submissions, 10 were accepted. The external review committee did a great job of providing detailed review feedback and participating actively in online discussion.

Other aspects of the OOPSLA review and publication process remain unchanged from previous years. As a PACMPL issue, all OOPSLA papers are available as open access from the ACM digital library, with SIGPLAN paying open access fees when authors cannot. OOPSLA has continued its two-phase reviewing process from previous years (a requirement for PACMPL issues), and we continued to run a separate artifact evaluation process to help certify supplementary artifacts for accepted papers.

It was my great honor and privilege to serve as review committee chair for OOPSLA. My thanks goes to the paper authors for submitting such exciting work to OOPSLA, and again to the review committees for their careful and detailed reviewing work. Thanks to previous chairs Yannis Smaragdakis and Jonathan Aldrich for help and advice throughout the process. And finally, thanks to Jan Vitek, who put a truly astounding amount of work into making SPLASH 2018 a success as general chair.

Welcome, and enjoy OOPSLA 2018!

Manu Sridharan
Uber
OOPSLA 2018 Review Committee Chair
Principal Editor of PACMPL Volume 2, Issue OOPSLA

Submission Preparation Instructions

PACMPL (OOPSLA) employs a two-stage, lightweight double-blind reviewing process, so papers must be anonymized.

Formatting: Submissions must be in PDF, printable in black and white on US Letter sized paper. All submissions must adhere to the “ACM Small” template available (in both LaTeX and Word formats) from http://www.acm.org/publications/authors/submissions. For LaTeX users, please use  acmart-pacmpl-template.tex, a lighter-weight package including only essential files, with the  acmsmall,  anonymous and review options. LaTeX-specific questions are fielded by the ACM.

Submitted papers may be at most 23 pages in 10 point font, excluding bibliographic references and appendices.

There is no page limit for bibliographic references and appendices. However, reviewers are not obligated to read the appendices.

Submissions do not meet the above requirements will be rejected without review.

Citations: Papers are expected to use author-year citations. Author-year citations may be used as either a noun phrase, such as “The lambda calculus was originally conceived by Church (1932)”, or a parenthetic phase, such as “The lambda calculus (Church 1932) was intended as a foundation for mathematics”. (Either parentheses or square brackets can be used to enclose the citations.) A useful test for correct usage it to make sure that the text still reads correctly when the parenthesized portions of any references are omitted. Take care with prepositions; in the first example above, “by” is more appropriate than “in” because it allows the text to be read correctly as a reference to the author. Sometimes, readability may be improved by putting parenthetic citations at the end of a clause or a sentence, such as “A foundation for mathematics was provided by the lambda calculus (Church 1932)”. In LaTeX, use  \citet{Church-1932} for citations as a noun phrase, “Church (1932)”, and  \citep{Church-1932} for citations as a parenthetic phrase, “(Church 1932)”; for details, see Sections 2.3–2.5 of the natbib documentation (natbib).

Author Response Period: from June 8-10, 2018 authors will be able to read reviews and respond to them.

Supplementary Materials: authors may attach non-anonymous supplementary material to a submission, on the understanding that reviewers may choose not to look at it. The material should be uploaded at submission time, as a single pdf or a tarball, not via a URL. This supplementary material need not be anonymized; it will only be revealed to reviewers after they have submitted their review.

Authorship Policies: All submissions are expected to comply with the  ACM Policies for Authorship.

Republication Policies: Papers must describe unpublished work that is not currently submitted for publication elsewhere as described by SIGPLAN’s Republication Policy. Submitters should also be aware of ACM’s Policy and Procedures on Plagiarism.

Information for Authors of Accepted Papers

  • The page limit for final versions of papers is 27 pages (excluding references) to ensure that authors have space to respond to reviewer comments and mandatory revisions.
  • PACMPL is a Gold Open Access journal. Authors may voluntarily cover the article processing charges (currently 400 USD).
  • We welcome all authors to attend OOPSLA and present accepted papers, regardless of nationality. If any author has visa-related difficulties, we will make arrangements to enable remote participation.
  • The official publication date is the date the papers are made available in the ACM Digital Library. This date may be up to two weeks prior to the first day of the conference. The official publication date affects the deadline for any patent filings related to published work.

The following content is based on Mike Hicks’s guidelines with input from Frank Tip, Keshav Pingali, Richard Jones, John Boyland, Yannis Smaragdakis and Jonathan Aldrich.

General

Q: Why double-blind reviewing?

A: Our goal is to give each a reviewer an unbiased “first look” at each paper. Studies have shown that a reviewer’s attitude toward a submission may be affected, even unconsciously, by the identity of the author. We want reviewers to be able to approach each submission without such involuntary reactions as “Barnaby; he writes a good paper” or “Who are these people? I have never heard of them.” For this reason, we ask that authors to omit their names from their submissions, and that they avoid revealing their identity through citation. A key principle to keep in mind is that we intend this process to be cooperative, not adversarial. If a reviewer does discover an author’s identity though a subtle clue or oversight the author will not be penalized.

Q: Do you think blinding works?

A: Studies of blinding with the flavor we are using show that author identities remain unknown 53% to 79% of the time. Moreover, about 5-10% of the time, a reviewer is certain of the authors, but then turns out to be at least partially mistaken. Yannis Smaragdakis’s survey of the OOPSLA 2016 PC showed that any given reviewer or a paper guessed at least one author correctly only 26-34% of the time, depending on whether you count a non-response to the survey as failure to guess or failure to answer. So, while sometimes authorship can be guessed correctly, the question is, is imperfect blinding better than no blinding at all? Our conjecture is that on balance the answer is “yes”.

Q: Can blind submission cause a paper to be rejected based on prior work by the same authors?

A: Author names are revealed to reviewers after they have submitted their review and before final decisions are made. Therefore, a reviewer can correct their review if they indeed have penalized the authors inappropriately. Unblinding prior to the PC meeting also avoids cases in which reviewers end up advancing the cause of a paper with which they have a conflict.

For Authors

Q: What do I have to do?

A: Your job is not to make your identity undiscoverable but simply to make it possible for our reviewers to evaluate your submission without having to know who you are. The main guidelines are simple: omit authors’ names from your title page, and when you cite your own work, refer to it in the third person. For example, if your name is Smith and you have worked on amphibious type systems, instead of saying “We extend our earlier work on statically typed toads (Smith 2004),” you might say “We extend Smith’s (2004) earlier work on statically typed toads.” Also, be sure not to include any acknowledgements that would give away your identity.

Q: How do I provide supplementary material?

A: On the submission site there will be an option to submit supplementary material along with your paper. This supplementary material need not be anonymized. Reviewers are under no obligation to look at this material. The submission itself is the object of review and so it should strive to convince the reader of at least the plausibility of reported results. Of course, reviewers are free to change their review upon viewing supplemental material. For those authors who wish to supplement, we encourage them to mention the supplement in the body of the paper and to make clear whether the supplementary material is anonymized or not. E.g., “The proof of Lemma 1 is included in the non-anonymous supplemental material submitted with this paper.”

Q: I am building on my work on the XYZ system. Do I rename it for anonymity?

A: No, you must not change the name and you should certainly cite your published past work on it! The relationship between systems and authors changes over time, so there will be at least some doubt about authorship.

Q: Can I submit a paper that extends a workshop paper?

A: Generally yes, but the ideal course of action depends on the degree of similarity and on publication status. On one extreme, if your workshop paper is a publication (i.e., the workshop has published a proceedings, with your paper in it) and your current submission improves on that work, then you should cite the workshop paper as if it were written by someone else. On the other extreme, if your submission is effectively a longer, more complete version of an unpublished workshop paper (e.g., no formal proceedings), then you should include a (preferably anonymous) version of the workshop paper as supplementary material. In general, there is rarely a good reason to anonymize a citation. When in doubt, contact the PC Chair.

Q: Am I allowed to post my paper on my web page, advertise it on mailing lists, send it to colleagues or give talks?

A: Double-blind reviewing should not hinder the usual communication of results. That said, we do ask that you not attempt to deliberately subvert the double-blind reviewing process by announcing the names of the authors of your paper to the potential reviewers of your paper. It is difficult to define exactly what counts as “subversion” here, but a blatant example would include sending individual e-mail to members of the PC about your work. On the other hand, it is fine to visit other institutions and give talks about your work, to present your submitted work during job interviews, to present your work at professional meetings, or to post your work on your web page. PC members will not be asked to recuse themselves from reviewing your paper unless they feel you have gone out of your way to advertise your authorship information to them. If you’re not sure about what constitutes “going out of your way”, please consult directly with the Program Chair.

We recognize that some researchers practice an open research style in which work is shared on mailing lists, arxiv, or social media as it is produced. We think this style of research can coexist with double-blind reviewing if authors follow simple guidelines. You may post to mailing lists, arxiv, social media, or another publicity channel about your work, but do not mention where the paper is submitted and do not use the exact, as-submitted title in the posting.

Q: Does double-blind have an impact on handling conflicts-of interest?

A: No. As an author, you should list PC members (and any others, since others may be asked for outside reviewers) who you believe have a conflict with you.

For Reviewers

Q: What should I do if I if I learn the authors’ identity?

A: If at any point you feel that the authors’ actions are largely aimed at ensuring that potential reviewers know their identity, you should contact the Program Chair. Otherwise you should not treat double-blind reviewing differently from regular blind reviewing. In particular, you should refrain from seeking out information on the authors’ identity, but if you discover it accidentally this will not automatically disqualify you as a reviewer. Use your best judgment.

Q: The authors provided a URL to supplemental material, I worry they will snoop my IP address. What should I do?

A: Contact the Program Chair, who will download the material on your behalf and make it available to you.

Q: Can I seek an outside review?

A: No. PC members should do their own reviews. If doing so is problematic, e.g., you don’t feel qualified, then consider the following options. First, submit a review that is as careful as possible, outlining areas where you think your knowledge is lacking. Assuming we have sufficient expert reviews, that could be the end of it: non-expert reviews are valuable too. Second, the review form provides a mechanism for suggesting additional expert reviewers to the PC Chair, who may contact them if additional expertise is needed.

We are grateful to the following researchers who provided additional external reviews for OOPSLA submissions.

  • Aws Albarghouthi
  • Robert Atkey
  • Raj Barik
  • Sam Blackshear
  • Björn B. Brandenburg
  • Sebastian Burckhardt
  • Michael Carbin
  • Aleksandar Chakarov
  • Stephen Chang
  • Keith Chapman
  • Jácome Cunha
  • Hoang-Hai Dang
  • Isil Dillig
  • Matthias Felleisen
  • Vijay Ganesh
  • Robert Grimm
  • Matthew Hammer
  • Chris Hawblitzel
  • Matthew Hicks
  • Chung-Kil Hur
  • Jean-Baptiste Jeannin
  • Michael Peyton Jones
  • Ralf Jung
  • Jan-Oliver Kaiser
  • Ohad Kammar
  • Nguyen Kim
  • Siddharth Krishna
  • Gary T. Leavens
  • Felix Xiaozhu Lin
  • Sam Lindley
  • Cristina Lopes
  • Giuliano Losa
  • Magnus Madsen
  • Mark Marron
  • Paul McKenney
  • Kayvan Memarian
  • Ali Mesbah
  • Martin Monperrus
  • Andrew Myers
  • Boyana Norris
  • Michael Norrish
  • David Padua
  • Michał Pałka
  • Tommaso Petrucciani
  • Ruzica Piskac
  • Azalea Raad
  • Reuben Rowe
  • Cole Schlesinger
  • Rishabh Singh
  • Youngju Song
  • Michael Spear
  • Olivier Tardieu
  • Ross Tate
  • James Wilcox
  • Nobuko Yoshida