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SEAMS 2018
Mon 28 - Tue 29 May 2018 Gothenburg, Sweden
co-located with ICSE 2018

SEAMS 2018 is co-located with ICSE 2018 in Gothenburg, Sweden and will be held from May 28-29, 2018.

Scope

Modern and emerging software systems, such as industrial Internet of Things, Cyber-Physical Systems, cloud and mobile computing, have to operate without interruption. Self-adaptation and self-management enable these systems to adapt themselves at runtime to preserve and optimize their operation in the presence of uncertain changes in their operating environment, resource variability, new user needs, attacks, intrusions, and faults.

Approaches to complement software-based systems with self-managing and self-adaptive capabilities are an important area of research and development, offering solutions that leverage advances in fields such as software architecture, fault-tolerant computing, programming languages, robotics, run-time program analysis and verification, among others. Additionally, research in this field is informed by related areas such as control systems, machine learning, artificial intelligence, agent-based systems, and biologically inspired computing. The SEAMS symposium focuses on applying software engineering to these approaches, including methods, techniques, processes and tools that can be used to support self-* properties like self-protection, self-healing, self-optimization, and self-configuration.

The objective of SEAMS is to bring together researchers and practitioners from diverse areas to investigate, discuss, and examine the fundamental principles, the state of the art, and critical challenges of engineering self-adaptive and self-managing systems.

Topics of Interest:

All topics related to engineering self-adaptive and self-managing systems, including:

Foundational Concepts

  • Understanding and taming uncertainty
  • Runtime models and variability
  • Online analysis and planning
  • Consistent change of systems in operation
  • Mixed-initiative and human-in-the-loop systems

Adaptation Objectives

  • Self-* properties
  • Automatic configuration, openness
  • Adaptive security and privacy (SEAMS’18 will devote a special session on this topic)

Engineering Strategies

  • Architecture and model-driven approaches
  • Control theory
  • Automatic synthesis techniques
  • Search-based techniques and learning

Engineering Activities

  • Requirements elicitation techniques
  • Architecture and design techniques
  • Systematic reuse (e.g., patterns, viewpoints, reference architectures, code)
  • Instrumentation of legacy systems (probing and effecting)
  • Processes and methodologies
  • Adaptation in the context of DevOps
  • Real-world demonstrators
  • Controlled experiments, case studies, replication studies, surveys

Analytical Methods

  • Runtime decision-making (multi-objective, multi-layered, distributed)
  • Analysis and testing frameworks
  • Verification and validation
  • Simulation

Languages

  • Formal notations for modeling and analyzing self-* properties
  • Domain-specific language support for self-adaptation
  • Programming language support for self-adaptation

Application Areas

  • Industrial internet of things
  • Cyber-physical systems
  • Cloud and edge computing
  • Robotics
  • Smart environments
  • Smart user interfaces

Artifacts

  • Model problems and exemplars
  • Resources including data sets, metrics, and software useful to compare self-adaptive approaches

Call for Papers

Paper Submission Details

SEAMS solicits different types of papers:

  • Long papers (10 pages main text, inclusive of figures, tables, appendices, etc.; plus references up to two additional pages). Long papers should: (1) clearly describe innovative and original research, or (2) report a survey on a research topic in the field, or (3) explain how existing techniques have been applied to a real-world case.

  • Comparative study papers (10 pages main text, plus references up to two additional pages). Comparative study papers should clearly describe a research problem and the artifact that is used to evaluate and compare at least two different solutions to the problem. The artifact used in a comparative study can be any artifact that is formally published, within or outside the SEAMS community. Comparative study papers are regular research papers, as long papers.

  • Short papers (6 pages + 1 page references). Short papers should describe novel and promising ideas and/or techniques that are in an early stage of development. To that end, short papers will be reviewed with dedicated review guidelines.

  • Extended abstracts on “security and adaptivity” (2 pages including references). SEAMS 2018 will organize a session devoted to “security and adaptivity” lead by David Garlan. Besides other types of submissions, interested authors are invited to submit an extended abstract in which they provide an argumentation either in favor or against the statement “security is not just another quality attribute in self-adaptive systems.”

  • Artifact papers (6 pages + 1 page references). Artifact papers should describe a model problem, an exemplar, or useful set of resources for the broader community. A model problem provides a description of a problem that poses and highlights fundamental or characteristic challenges in the area of self-adaptive systems that should be addressed. An exemplar is an implementation of a system that can be used with multiple self-adaptive approaches. A data repository provides data (e.g., logging data, system traces, survey raw data) useful in other studies. A framework offers tools and services illustrating new approaches to self-adaptation that could be used by other researchers in different contexts.

  • Doctoral project paper (4 pages + 1 page references). A doctoral project paper should describe the dissertation research of a PhD student in the field of self-adaptive and self-managing systems. Students of accepted papers will have a short time slot to introduce their research and interact with the audience during a poster session. Instructions for formatting posters will be provided after the notification. We encourage submissions from PhD students at any stage of their research.

All submitted papers and artifacts will be reviewed by at least three members of the program committee. Papers must not have been previously published or concurrently submitted elsewhere. Papers must conform to ACM formatting guidelines (see ICSE 2018 style guidelines here and here), and submitted via EasyChair. Accepted papers will appear in the symposium proceedings that will be published in the ACM and IEEE digital libraries. The official publication date of an accepted paper will be the date the proceedings are made available in the ACM Digital Library. This date may be up to two weeks prior to the first day of ICSE2018. The official publication date affects the deadline for any patent filings related to published work. Purchases of additional pages in the proceedings is not allowed.

Accepted artifact papers will also be archived on the Dagstuhl Artifacts Series (DARTS).

Symposia-related email should be addressed to: seams-2018-org [AT] cs.kuleuven.be

Follow SEAMS 2018 on Twitter and Facebook.

SEAMS 2018 flyer (pdf)

SEAMS community page: http://self-adaptive.org