Blogs (61) >>
ECOOP and ISSTA
Sun 15 - Sat 21 July 2018 Amsterdam, Netherlands
Tue 17 Jul 2018 09:30 - 10:20 at Matterhorn - Keynote

We study all sorts of aspects of programming languages, their ease of use, type system, their level of abstractness, but we feel one aspect is overlooked, how a programming language sounds like when read aloud. Is reading aloud hard? Well, yes. We found that developers cannot pronounce code in a consistent fashion. We had 25 experienced developers read code aloud, and it was a mess, even for simple statements. For example, how to pronounce an assignment statement like x = 5? Is it “x is 5”? Or “set x to 5”? Or “x gets 5”? And what about an equality check? Is it “if x is is 5”? Or “if x is 5”? Or “is x is equal to 5”? What can we learn from reading code aloud? We think programming language designers could learn a lot from hearing their language spoken. For example, if programmers consistently read if x == 5 as “if x is 5”, = or even is might be better keyword. What is the ultimate end game of this idea? We envision programming language designers of the future to prescribe a way that their language sounds, much like languages have style guides. When the sound or ‘phonology’ is defined, it can be practiced, taught and analyzed. This will be useful while learning to program, but could be a valuable tool people that interact with code in an oral way, such as visually and physically disabled programmers, and developers that are doing (remote) pair programming. What will the talk cover? In the talk, we will describe our experiment and what we learned from it, so other interested in exploring how languages sound can start well-prepared and informed.

I am assistant professor at Delft University of Technology, where where I research end-user programming. End-user programming is programming for everyone that does not think of themselves as a programmer. In my PhD dissertation I worked on applying methods from software engineering to spreadsheets. During my PhD I founded a company called Infotron, which sells a tool called PerfectXL based on techniques I developed to spot errors in spreadsheets. Me, my research and my company have gotten some media coverage over the last years. One of my biggest passions in life is to share my enthusiasm for programming/tech with others. I teach a bunch of kids LEGO Mindstorms programming every Saturday in a local community center. Furthermore, I am one of the founders of the Joy of Coding conference, a one day developer conference in Rotterdam and one of the hosts of the Software Engineering Radio podcast, one of the biggest software podcasts on the web. When I am not coding, blogging or teaching, I am probably dancing Lindy Hop with my beau Rico, out running, watching a movie or playing a (board)game.

Tue 17 Jul

curryon-2018-papers
09:15 - 10:20: Curry On Keynotes - Keynote at Matterhorn
curryon-2018-papers09:15 - 09:30
Jan VitekNortheastern University, Heather MillerEcole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne
curryon-2018-papers09:30 - 10:20
Talk