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ICSE 2022
Dates and location to be announced

Welcome to the First International Workshop on..

Designing and Running Project-Based Courses in Software Engineering Education (DREE)



Software engineering courses should prepare students for industrial careers. Ideally, students should work with industrial-scale projects that are being actively developed. Unfortunately, implementing this in the context of a course can be challenging, and so many courses only work with greenfield projects, shielding students from the complexity and scale they are likely to encounter in industry. The few courses that do utilize real-world software often work with older projects, and once projects have been used once, solutions begin to appear online.

In spite of these myriad challenges, software engineering educators often do manage to design and run engaging, project-based courses where students develop the skills that are necessary for the industry. The purpose of this workshop is to learn from the hard-fought lessons of these project-based courses, reflecting upon successes and challenges faced in our daily struggle to prepare the next generation.

In this workshop, we solicit experience papers, detailing the experience learned during a single class iteration, technique papers, describing the strategies used to create engaging project across multiple years, and scaffolding papers, focusing on giving students the necessary support they need to be successful in a project-based course.

After each paper session the workshop will be broken down into small groups. These groups will be tasked with synthesizing what has been learned from the presentations thus far, and what is known to work from the group members’ own experience. For the first small group session the emphasis will be on collecting and describing the lessons learned and for the second small group session the emphasis will be on collecting and describing best practices.

The output of these sessions will be carefully collected by the workshop organizers. It will be used to create a workshop report that will become publicly available shortly after the workshop. If the contents warrant it, this report may be submitted to an upcoming education conference as a many-authored paper, using evidence from several of the submitted projects to support a larger lesson or best practice. This outcome-based approach focuses this workshop on being a working venue, not just a mini-conference.



How to submit

See “Call for Papers” tab.

Call for Papers

The purpose of our workshop will be to collect and learn from the lessons of practicing software engineering educators. We solicit three types of four-page papers, listed below. However, we would like to emphasize that this workshop strongly encourages the open, or semi-open (to keep answers from being circulated to students) sharing of project materials across universities and courses. Participants should, in addition to these paper submissions, be prepared to bring supporting material including source code repositories, pre-configured virtual machines, assignment handouts, project rubrics, etc.

To describe their experience with project-based courses, we invite the following types of papers:

  1. Experience papers, detailing the experience learned during a single class iteration,
  2. Technique papers, describing the strategies used to create engaging projects across multiple years,
  3. Scaffolding papers, focusing on giving students the necessary support they need to be successful in a project-based course.

Note that all papers will need to be grounded in practice; all papers must include at least some data from a recent semester. Again, we would like to emphasize that successful papers should include or reference extensive supporting materials including access to the project, project assignments, and project assessments. Furthermore, authors are expected to describe their learning objectives for course projects as well as the metrics and best practices used for gauging student learning outcomes. Authors are also encouraged to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis and the long-term sustainability of their instructional practices in terms of effort. They are encouraged to perform an analysis of the suitability of transferring their own successful course projects to other instructors or institutions.

Papers can be submitted at https://dree22.hotcrp.com/

Questions? Use the DREE contact form.